Green Leek Powder – A Low FODMAP Substitute for Onion Powder

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A few days ago I had a brain wave. It started off with me getting really annoyed, as I couldn’t find a decent looking dry bouillon recipe that didn’t contain onion or garlic powder. Green leek tips are my go-to onion replacement method in most meals… why couldn’t there be a green leek tip powder?

Why couldn’t there, indeed? I just had to make it myself.

It worked beautifully in the bouillon powder and I am sure it will work just as well in any dry rubs and spice blends in the future. This method would also work for the green parts of chives/spring onions, just beware that it will probably take a lot less time and the temperature might need to be lowered – I have not done it myself, so I can’t give exact numbers.

FODMAP Notes

  1. Green leek tips are low FODMAP in 1/2 cup serves, any more and fructans might be an issue. Make sure you measure your green leek tips before you desiccate them, so you know by how much they have reduced. The leek tips I used reduced by half, so 1/4 cup is the new low FODMAP serving size. You get the picture.
  2. Do not use white leek (the bulb) while on elimination, as these are given a high FODMAP rating. If you are off elimination and have tested them successfully, use your discretion as to whether you try them out here or not.
  3. Try asking your supermarket/local green grocers if they have any leeks that have not had their tips trimmed, or if they could perhaps occasionally order them in for you. You’d be surprised what they’d agree to, though a local grocery store is more likely to agree to strange requests.
  4. If you decide to grow your own leeks, you can:
    1. Grow from seeds, or the 2 inch base of the bulb planted in fertile soil.
    2. Grow in full sunlight (not planted down in little valleys as leeks typically are), so the extra sun stimulates more chlorophyll production. This means that more of the leek will be green leaf and less white bulb.
    3. Pick leaves off as required, leaving the plant to grow for the season.

Green Leek Powder

Serving size depends on the difference between the initial amount and final amount (see notes).

  • 1 bunch green leek tips, weight measured.

Preheat your oven to 90 C/200 F.

Slice your leek where the green becomes white. The more sensitive you are to fructans, the less white you should allow to bleed into the greens you keep. Give the white bits to a neighbour, or anyone else who can use them.

Separate the leaves and wash them thoroughly. Pat dry.

Arrange them in a single layer on lined baking trays, then put into the oven. Shut the oven door – we are not truly dehydrating them here but also roasting them a little. The intensifies and adds to the flavour, both good things.

Set the timer for two hours, then check them every 15 minutes thereafter. They are ready when they are crispy and snap easily when bent.

Let them cool to room temp, then smoosh (for lack of a better term) them into your food processor and blitz until a fine powder forms. I needed to use my coffee grinder to get the fine powder you see above, as my small food processor is on its last legs.

Use as required as a substitute for onion powder, like in a low FODMAP bouillon powder or instant noodle cup. Enjoy!

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4 thoughts on “Green Leek Powder – A Low FODMAP Substitute for Onion Powder

  1. This is excellent! I too am continuously frustrated by onion powder making its way into everything. Does EVERY spice and soup mix really need it? I know so many people who have tummies who don’t get along with onions it amazes me that the food industry hasn’t figured this out yet. Thanks for sharing! Now the trick is to buy leeks where the grocery staff haven’t cut off all the green parts!

    • A trick I learnt – if you grow your own, grow the leeks in full sun as the sunlight triggers production of chlorophyll (the green pigment). That way more of your leeks will be green. But I also wish the supermarkets wouldn’t cut them off… maybe if they sold them separately?

  2. This is a brilliant idea!
    I’m going to try this with the green part of shallots and see how it goes. Can’t wait to have some powdered vege stock on hand again!

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