Further Food: Eat Better, Go Further

Hi everyone! I’m sorry for the long break between posts but I’ll explain why in my next entry, which will be out tomorrow. Long story short, we’ve had an exciting couple of months.

I just wanted to take some time to share with you that I’ve been collaborating with Further Food, a website that encourages good health through nutritious (and delicious!) recipes. They started up last year and have grown from a handful of initial contributors (of which I was lucky enough to be one) to a community of like-minded people who aim to manage their health (and any conditions) through food.

Food bloggers like myself submit recipes and the team at Further Food tests them out and has one of their nutritionists or registered dietitians provide comments on the nutritional breakdown. A few of my recipes have been featured and I’m even working on another couple of related articles with the staff. I encourage you to head over, check out my profile and the recipes I’ve shared there…

My pumpkin pie recipe is delicious and apparently quite healthy, too! Who’d have thought?… Just kidding, I intended it to be a not-so-junky dessert.

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This cast iron cornbread recipe is a favourite of mine, it goes well with any warm and nourishing soup or stew, or even just spread with your favourite low FODMAP jam.

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This balsamic and rosemary chicken risotto is both nourishing and easily digestible, for those days when your stomach isn’t quite up to a full meal.

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These strawberry and coconut chia seed puddings pack a nutritional punch and double (actually, triple!) up as a tasty breakfast, snack or dessert. I mean, really, they’re dessert for breakfast without the guilt. You can’t beat that.

Recipes

To stay up to date on my contributions and more health-supportive recipes, like them on Facebook and sign up for their newsletter!

Cheers, guys! I’ll be back tomorrow with another healthy breakfast recipe. See you then!

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How to Complete a Gluten Challenge while remaining Low FODMAP (with Seitan Recipe)

How to complete a gluten challenge while remaining Low FODMAP - NOTFROMAPACKETMIX

Updated on 28.01.17

For reasons that I have mentioned before, it is crucial to get tested for Coeliac disease (CD) before you begin any elimination diets that cut out the gluten containing grains – this includes the low FODMAP diet, which eliminates wheat, barley and rye for the two month elimination period due to their fructan content. Oats also contain a protein called avenin, which is very similar to gluten and can also cause issues in overly sensitive individuals. There are many reasons why it’s important to be correctly diagnosed (which includes ruling possible differential diagnoses out) but I’ll expand on the most relevant to fructose malabsorption (FM) or the low FODMAP diet.

What is the difference between Coeliac disease and non coeliac gluten sensitivity?

Coeliac disease is an autoimmune condition in which your body’s immune system reacts to the plant-protein gluten (found in wheat, barley, rye and their derivatives) in such a way that your small intestine lining becomes the target, causing damage to your small bowel and villous atrophy. Villous atrophy in turn leads to a reduced surface area for nutrient absorption, which can contribute to malnutrition, malabsorptive disorders, osteoporosis and many other secondary complications, such as an increased risk of certain cancers. To rule CD in or out, a blood test to check for tissue transglutaminase antibodies is performed and followed up with an endoscopy to confirm any damage to the small intestine.

Non coeliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS), on the other hand, is not as well understood. It is the label given to those who test negative for CD, yet are still apparently affected by gluten. One study suggests that it is not the gluten in the grains but the fructans (acting alone or in combination with the gluten) that are causing sufferers to be symptomatic. Other research hints that it might be an innate immune response, rather than the adaptive immune response of CD, which causes the reaction to gluten-full foods and leads to symptoms that are very similar to those experienced by Coeliacs. Because there is no science-based standardised test to check for NCGS, the diagnosis is one of elimination – other conditions, like CD or a wheat allergy, are ruled out but you find you still improve on a gluten free diet – and NCGS is the possibility that is left.

If you do in fact have undiagnosed CD or NCGS, the low FODMAP diet isn’t anywhere near strict enough to be considered safe for you, as after the elimination phase comes the reintroduction phase, in which you are encouraged to test out foods higher in fermentable carbohydrates – this includes offending grains, which will just make you sick again. If you have CD, you must limit your gluten exposure to basically nothing (less than 20 ppm in the USA is considered safe), so even a contaminated chopping board or deep fryer could make you sick, let alone testing out a full slice of bread. If you have already been diagnosed with CD, you can skip those foods, saving you time and gut hurt… or any of your other symptoms that are caused by gluten.

Furthermore, if you have undiagnosed CD or NCGS, once you have finished the elimination phase and begin to test out wheat, rye and barley, you’ll realise that they bring on symptoms (either IBS or other) and you won’t know whether FM or CD is behind them – and to test for CD, you need to have gluten in your system for an established autoimmune reaction to be visible. If you haven’t been eating gluten, any damage from CD, or any sign of the relevant antibodies, will begin to disappear, meaning that you may test negative, regardless of whether you have active Coeliac disease or not. This is called a false negative result.

How to complete a low FODMAP gluten challenge

If, for one reason or another, you find yourself having been on a long term gluten free diet, yet needing to test for Coeliac disease, there is unfortunately no other way to confirm the diagnosis than to complete a gluten challenge. Instructions vary slightly but, in general, it is recommended that every day, for somewhere between six to twelve weeks (ask your gastroenterologist what they would prefer), you must consume the equivalent of four slices of bread if you’re an adult, or two slices of bread if you’re a child.

Given that:

  • The average bread slice weighs approximately 30 g,
  • Bread is typically at least 10% gluten by weight.
  • This means that the average slice of bread contains approximately 3 grams of gluten.
  • Extrapolating from the number of slices necessary for the gluten challenge, the gluten requirement works out to be 12.0 g of gluten for an adult and 6.0 g of gluten for a child, daily.

After writing the previous post, it seems almost hypocritical to tell you that I had to complete a three month gluten challenge in 2014. You can read my diagnosis story here but, long story short, I tested negative to Coeliac disease (both the antibody blood test and endoscopy) back in 2006 but then tested positive for fructose malabsorption. However, after eating largely gluten free (I didn’t worry about minute levels of contamination), I found myself, at the beginning of 2014, experiencing worsening IBS symptoms and extreme fatigue/brain fog. Ev even asked if I was broken. Now, I felt pretty certain that the culprit was the spelt flour (non-sourdough) that I had been consuming, after reading that it was low FODMAP – note, only sourdough spelt is considered low FODMAP, I had just read inaccurate information. However, the question stood: was it the fructans or the gluten that was causing this relapse?

I know that many people out there would happily re-eliminate the spelt flour and move on with their lives – but I’m not one of them. If there’s a question, I’m the type of person who needs to know the answer. So, I spoke to my GP, who referred me to a gastroenterologist and I began a twelve week gluten challenge. However, I know that fructans in wheat (and to some extent, rye) make me sick – what was I to do? The answer to your low FODMAP gluten challenge question is: SEITAN.

Seitan is a vegan protein/meat replacement that is made from vital wheat gluten, which is normally 75-80% gluten – and coincidentally, registers as low FODMAP. Now, let’s do some maths… stand back.

  • An adult needs to consume 12.0 g of gluten per day, a child 6.0 g.
  • Let’s assume that the vital wheat gluten (gluten flour) was only 75% gluten, to be safe. However, if you can get a more pure version of it, do so, as the more gluten it contains, the less likely it is to contain any FODMAPs.
  • 12.0 g / 75% = 16.0 g, so an adult would need to consume 16.0 g of the vital wheat gluten, daily, to ensure we are getting at least 12.0 g of low FODMAP gluten. A child would obviously only need to consume 8.0 g.
  • The recipe below is in grams, to keep it simple: 240 g of VWG will give fifteen 16.0 g servings or thirty 8.0 g servings.

You could just pop your seitan chunks like a form of medicine and be done with it but it was fun to experiment with it in cooking and I probably ended up consuming more than the 12.0 g of gluten on the days when we did so… which might have contributed to my gut’s unhappiness and the fatigue.

Seitan with Italian Herbs and Spices

Based off Bob’s Red Mill’s basic seitan recipe.

Seitan Dough

  • 250 ml FODMAP friendly stock or water
  • 1 pinch asafoetida
  • 1 tbsp. dried oregano
  • 2 tsp. salt
  • 1 tsp. pepper
  • 1 tsp. dried rosemary
  • 1 tsp. dried sage
  • 240 g gluten flour/vital wheat gluten

Broth

  • 1.5 L of water
  • 1/4 cup soy sauce

In a large pot (I cannot emphasise this enough, seitan balloons!) bring the broth mixture to a boil.

Meanwhile, mix the gluten flour, herbs, salt and pepper together in a large bowl. Slowly add in the stock and stir/knead until it’s a sponge-like dough. It should be tacky to the touch but not wet. Tip it out onto a well floured bench (use more gluten flour) and knead it for a minute or two, until it becomes tougher and more elastic.

Cut it into sixths, then roll them out into logs and divide each one into twenty. There you go, you now have 120 pieces and four pieces equals one daily serving of gluten for an adult.

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Place the seitan dough in the boiling water and boil for one hour. Watch how it expands – I needed to swap saucepans halfway through.

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After boiling, the seitan still isn’t good to eat. At this point, I like to think of it as “raw” meat. The flavour is nice, thanks to the spices, but the texture isn’t great. Spread the seitan out on a tray to dry, then use it in stir fries, pan fry it, bake it – it all works.

Baked seitan:

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Pan fried seitan with mirepoix as a dipping sauce:

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For those who were just curious, I hope you found this piece interesting. For those who have fructose malabsorption or IBS and need to complete a gluten challenge – good luck. I didn’t find it fun, in terms of fatigue, but I hope you fare differently.

After getting back to a normal diet (still no active Coeliac disease, phew), I have learnt that I can cope with a bit of gluten every now and then, so it’s clearly not as big of an issue for me as the fructans are. Luckily, that means that I can still enjoy (proper) sourdough breads in moderation. Yum.

This post is intended for educational purposes only. Please run anything that I have written here by your doctor or dietitian (etc) to make sure it is suitable for your individual case.

In terms of FODMAPs, vital wheat gluten is generally considered low but it is not recommended for consumption during the elimination phase of the low FODMAP diet. As always, it’s best to not need to do a gluten challenge at all, by testing for gluten/wheat related conditions before an elimination diet has begun but this isn’t always possible, for a variety of reasons.

Unfortunately, you might react during a gluten challenge (that’s the point, after all); this method just minimises the chance of that reaction being due to the fructans in wheat as much as possible.

Ten Reasons to get tested for Coeliac Disease BEFORE Going Gluten Free

Ten reasons to get tested for coeliac disease before going gluten free

As many people are aware – and just as many people aren’t – gluten is a protein that is found in the grains wheat, barley and rye (and their derivatives). A very similar protein, avenin, is found in oats, and can also cause a gluten-like reaction in some very sensitive people.

Gluten is the trigger behind the autoimmune disease known as Coeliac disease and is also a known gut irritant for some people with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) or any of the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). For these people, eliminating gluten from their diets is crucial to improving both their gut and overall health. For others, it might be completely unnecessary.

Now, obviously, the reasons listed below are relevant for those who have access to testing for Coeliac disease, either by blood test or endoscopy. If you, for either medical, financial or geographical reasons, cannot be tested for Coeliac and you feel like gluten-containing foods set you off, then nobody can stop you from doing what you feel is necessary, using whatever resources you can find. However, I strongly urge anyone who feels like they have symptoms, either IBS-like or other, that are related to food to go and see their medical professional of choice.

So, here they are:

The top ten reasons to check with your doctor before you begin a gluten free diet

  1. Coeliac disease testing relies on a reaction to gluten: Coeliac disease (CD) is an autoimmune disease in which your immune system reacts to the presence of the protein gluten as it would to an infection – with an immune response that attacks your own tissue, damaging your intestinal lining, which can cause both symptoms of IBS (pain, gas, bloating) and reactions elsewhere in the body (joint pain, headaches etc). Tests for active CD rely on looking for specific antibodies, via a blood sample, or evidence of CD specific damage to the small intestine, via a gastroscopy/endoscopy. If you have already eliminated gluten from your diet, your test results will not be reliable, as any reaction may have disappeared and you could in fact be showing a false negative.
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  2. To differentiate between Coeliac disease and Non Coeliac Gluten Sensitivity (NCGS): If you suspect that the consumption of gluten containing foods precedes your IBS or any other symptoms, it is important to know which you have. If you have CD, you know that you must be careful down to the tiniest speck of contamination – less than 20 ppm, in the USA. It is unknown how “strict” those with NCGS must be, medically speaking, in terms of gluten contamination. It might be as strict as CD, less strict, or even dependent on the individual – but if you have ruled out CD, you can then work with your doctor to decide what’s best for your own case based on current medical knowledge.
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  3. Coeliac disease is genetic: If you have CD, one of your parents must be carrying the gene and may also have an active form of the disease, which can sometimes be silent. If you have children, it’s important to know what their chances are of developing CD in the future – this includes a blood test to check for genetic susceptibility (did you pass on the gene?) and a test for active CD, if you did.
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  4. Self-diagnosis can be very dangerous; you might miss the actual diagnosis! If you are having worsening digestive symptoms, gluten isn’t the only potential cause. It could also be ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease, or colon cancer. Each requires proper medical management, which might include a gluten free diet but it certainly won’t be limited to it. If you are not accurately diagnosed, the repercussions to your health could be severe, if an undiagnosed condition goes untreated.
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    Following on, if you go gluten free without any testing or medical advice, you will not get the chance to hear about other potential causes. Symptomatic malabsorption of fermentable carbohydrates is now thought to be much more common that NCGS, with a study showing that those with NCGS who began to follow a low FODMAP diet had significantly improved symptoms. This is not saying that those with NCGS don’t have a real problem, just that the culprit might not be the gluten in the wheat – it might be the fructans.
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  5. Coeliac disease doesn’t just cause digestive distress: The most commonly known symptoms of CD include gas, bloating, gut cramps and altered bowel movements etc. However, long-term, unchecked CD can lead to a whole host of issues, including (but not limited to), malnutrition, lactose intolerance, osteoporosis, infertility and even an increased risk of certain cancers. It’s definitely advisable to rule CD in or out and hopefully reduce your risk of developing one of the possible secondary health issues by following a strict gluten free diet with medical assistance as required.
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  6. Save money on healthcare: In some countries, only certain medical tests are covered by Medicare (or the equivalent) or private health insurance. Chances are that you are more likely to be financially covered for a science-based diagnostic test for CD than you are for any alternative-medicine-based tests, so why not try the standard tests first and see where they get you, before going down the potentially more expensive route. A proper medical diagnosis of CD (or any other food related illness) might also mean that your school/college/university has to provide you with suitable foods, saving you money and time on meals that you might otherwise have to prepare for yourself and bring from home.
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  7. Save money on unnecessary gluten free products: If you compared the grocery bills of two people who ate the same diet, except one of those people bought gluten free versions of the processed foods (bread, cereals, pasta, sauces, cookies etc), you will find that the gluten free person spends quite a bit more. If you don’t have a medical reason for buying gluten/wheat free products, you will save a decent amount of your weekly grocery bill by buying the normal versions of the products. This goes for FODMAPs, too, though we aren’t at the point of being a fad diet and most people are still finding out about it from their doctors/dietitians etc.
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  8. Just because it’s gluten free, doesn’t mean it’s healthy: Is a doughnut healthy? Not in my eyes. Is a gluten free doughnut automatically healthier? Definitely not. If you eliminate gluten by eliminating processed gluten-full foods and replace them with gluten free whole foods and the occasional gluten free grain like rice or corn then yes, your diet will likely be healthier than before. However, if you just replace your bagels and cupcakes with a gluten free version, you are doing nothing for your non-gluten-related overall health.
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  9. Social acceptance: It’s unfortunate but many people will judge those who are self diagnosed or follow what they perceive to be a fad diet. I try to educate waiters about fructose malabsorption and the fructans in wheat (if they ask, of course) when I order a gluten free meal – partly because I want to spread awareness of fructose malabsorption and FODMAPs but also because I want to distinguish myself from those who do follow “gluten free” as a fad diet and have my dietary requests taken seriously. It’s sad that I need to do this but necessary, which I’ll explain in #10.
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  10. Food safety and cross contamination: As I mentioned in #9, wait or kitchen staff (or, sadly, even family members) might take it upon themselves to decide exactly how gluten free your meal must be. If you don’t have a formal diagnosis of CD or NCGS from your doctor, these people are more likely to slack off with the meal prep safety and feed you contaminated food, which will ultimately affect your health and wellness. This unfortunately goes for many food intolerances, even nut allergies!

Fad gluten free (or anything-free) diets are a pet peeve of mine. I try not to be too zealous about certain things in life – I don’t want to annoy friends of mine who are not interested in digestive health, after all – but when it comes to “going gluten free” on a whim, I can’t always hold my tongue. To my friends and family, I do apologise. To my readers, though, I feel it’s something that should be put out on the internet again and again, to make as many people as possible aware of the dangers of uneducated dieting.

This article is written for educational purposes only and is not intended to replace a proper medical assessment. Please run anything written here past your own health care practitioner to make sure it is the right course of action for you.

Low FODMAP Cookbook: The Everything Guide to the Low-FODMAP Diet – by Dr. Barbara Bolen and Kathleen Bradley CPC

EV GT Low FODMAP cover

I have been receiving Dr. Barbara Bolen’s emails from About.com’s IBS section for a while now (at least a full year); I find them both interesting and informative, and I really appreciate the evidence that is given, to back any claims, as well – not every site does that, which can make it hard for beginners, if they don’t know who or what to trust. So, when Dr. Bolen contacted me about her new book, The Everything® Guide to the Low-FODMAP Diet (link to website here), I was happy to get involved. I do owe her and Kathleen Bradley an apology, though, as this post is quite late (visa issues, an epileptic dog and no internet access in Queensland got in the way). Better late than never, though, right? I am really very sorry, though!

If you aren’t aware of the authors, I will give you a quick introduction:

  • Barbara Bolen is a psychologist and health coach who specialises in digestive health. Dr. Bolen runs a private psychotherapy clinic and health coaching business in addition to serving as the IBS expert for About.com. Her previous works include Breaking the Bonds of Irritable Bowel Syndrome, IBS Chat: Real Life Stories and Solutions (co-author) and now The Everything® Guide to the Low-FODMAP Diet. Knowing what we do now about how stress and depression can affect IBS (and vice versa), Dr. Bolen is in a unique position to help people optimise their mental, digestive and overall health.
  • Kathleen Bradley, CPC is a writer, consultant, recipe developer and professional coach with over twenty years of experience in the field of publishing. Kathleen was diagnosed with IBS in 2011 and has extensively researched the low FODMAP diet in order to combat her symptoms; it made sense to combine her passion for healthy cooking with recipes low in fermentable carbs in order to manage IBS and other digestive disorders. The Everything® Guide to the Low-FODMAP Diet is Kathleen’s first cookbook.

The low FODMAP diet, as most of us know by now (or possibly not, if you’ve only just heard of it here) is a way of eating that is low in fermentable carbohydrates. However odd this may sound, it is no fad diet. Studies suggest that a low FODMAP diet can significantly improve IBS symptoms in up to 75% of sufferers. The science behind it is beautifully simple – certain carbohydrates are more likely to be fermented (digested) by your gut’s resident bacteria than others. These carbs, known by the acronym FODMAPs (fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols), are selectively restricted in order to prevent the fermentation that leads to bloating, gas and abdominal distress, which are the hallmarks of irritable bowel syndrome. Read more here, if you are interested… or buy the book!

Here are Dr. Bolen and Kathleen Bradley’s Top Ten Tips for Low FODMAP Diet Success:

  1. Be open with others about your special dietary needs. No need to be embarrassed, simply tell people that you are on a special diet for your stomach.
  1. Read labels carefully! Watch out for those hidden high FODMAP ingredients, such as gluten, HFCS, onion and garlic flavoring, inulin and artificial sweeteners ending in -ol.
  1. Pick restaurants that offer gluten-free options. They will be more likely to be willing to prepare foods in a way that is appropriate for you.
  1. Feel free to eat protein foods, such as meat, chicken, fish and pork, as long as they are not prepared with high FODMAP ingredients.
  1. Learn to love cooking. Preparing your own food is the best way to have full control over what you are eating.
  1. Move all high-FODMAP foods and ingredients to a designated part of your kitchen or get rid of them altogether.
  1. Make a list of appropriate substitutions for your favorite foods. For example: if you love cous cous, try millet; substitute pepitas for pistachios; tamari for soy sauce; etc.
  1. Pack low-FODMAP foods and snacks to take with you. For travel, Low-FODMAP cereal or granola doesn’t need refrigeration and can work as a snack as well as a meal substitution.
  1. Don’t go it alone! Reach out to a registered dietician or certified health coach for guidance and support.
  1. Remember to periodically challenge your sensitivity to foods so as to increase the variety of foods that you can eat.

To help publicise their new cookbook, Dr. Bolen has kindly provided answers to some of the most frequently asked FODMAP-related questions:

  1. Is the low-FODMAP diet too complicated for the average person?The diet is complex, there is no doubt about that. For best success, a person should work with a dietary professional to ensure that all nutritional needs are being met. Also, it does take time to figure out what one can eat and what one shouldn’t eat. That said, once a person is on the diet for a week or so, they start to get the hang of it. They get into a routine, they develop a new set of comfort or go-to foods and find places where they know they can get FODMAP-friendly foods.
  2. Some people find that some of the foods on the Allowed list are problematic. Why is that so?

The Allowed lists typically are comprised of foods that have been tested and found to be low in FODMAPs. However, every body is unique and it may be that certain foods trigger people for reasons other than their FODMAP content.

  1. Why do some foods come up on the Restricted list on some lists and the Allowed list on others?

It is important to remember that not all foods have been specifically tested for their FODMAP content. Some lists contain foods that were characterized by “best guesses” at the time. The most up-to-date resource for the FODMAP content of food is Monash University, either through their website, their publications or their mobile app.

  1. What about foods that do not show up on FODMAP food lists?

Keep in mind that FODMAPs are carbohydrates. Therefore, there are no FODMAPs in foods comprised of protein or fat. A person on the low-FODMAP diet can eat these foods freely. When in doubt about a food that does not show up on FODMAP food lists, one can make a guess based on the FODMAP content of similar foods.

  1. Is the low-FODMAP diet safe for vegetarians and vegans?

The diet can be challenging for vegetarians and vegans due to the restriction of many legumes. The diet can be safely followed as long as there is a concerted effort to take in adequate protein. Lacto-ovo vegetarians can meet their protein needs through eggs, hard cheeses, and lactose-free milk products. For those who do not eat eggs and dairy products, low-FODMAP nuts, seeds, milk substitutes and grains can provide some protein. Tofu, tempeh and seitan (non-celiacs only) are also allowed in all phases of the diet. Last, small amounts of well-rinsed canned lentils and chick peas have been shown to be low-FODMAP. It is advisable that vegetarians and vegans work with a qualified dietary professional to ensure that they are consuming safe levels of protein.

Stay tuned for a recipe sneak peek from Dr. Bolen and Kathleen Bradley’s new book! There are so many delicious options, I couldn’t decide what to try first.

How to Manage your Irritable Bowel Syndrome with the Low FODMAP Diet

Hi guys, I’m really excited to announce that I was asked to write an article about fructose malabsorption for Suggestic, a website that deals with nutrition, food intolerances and restaurant suggestions. Well, apparently I was a little enthusiastic – I didn’t want to miss anything – so I needed to split the article in two. I have already shared part one, so here goes part two:

Last week I talked about fructose malabsorption, its link to irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and the similarities it shares with non-coeliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS). This week, I will expand on the “fructose friendly” dietary management strategy for fructose malabsorption – the complete low FODMAP diet – that is gaining traction as the frontline dietary method for combating IBS symptoms.

IBS is generally understood as a long-term or recurrent disorder involving the function of your gastrointestinal system, usually due to imbalances of intestinal motility, function and sensation, leading to symptoms of digestive distress. It is a common occurrence in Western countries, with up to 30% of the population being affected at some point in their lives, women generally more-so than men.

What are FODMAPs?

FODMAPs” is an acronym that stands for fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols and describes a group of readily fermentable carbohydrates that are not well absorbed in the small intestines of some people; if these carbohydrates are not broken down and/or transported through the intestinal wall and into your blood stream, they continue down into your colon, where the resident gut bacteria digest them, leading to a build-up of certain gases and short chain fatty acids, which can alter the water content of your large intestine. These products of fermentation are the causes for the wind, bloating, abdominal cramps/pain and altered bowel movements that you associate with your fructose malabsorption, lactose intolerance or IBS.

The list of FODMAPs includes:

  • Monosaccharides (single sugar units) – fructose (when consumed in excess of glucose) and galactose.
  • Disaccharides (double sugar units) – lactose.
  • Oligosaccharides (multiple sugar units) – fructans (FOS, inulin), galactans (galactooligosaccharides or GOS)
  • Polyols (sugar alcohols) – sorbitol, mannitol and other sweeteners ending in “-tol.” Some polyols, such as sorbitol and erythritol, have the added effect of decreasing the rate of fructose absorption in the small intestine even further when consumed in large enough amounts.

There are hydrogen/methane breath tests that can check whether you malabsorb fructose, lactose and/or sorbitol but the other FODMAPs must be properly eliminated and then tested with a reintroduction trial (outlined below) to know whether they are causing your symptoms…”

Read more at Suggestic.com

Once again, let me know what you guys think! I sincerely hope I didn’t miss anything out – I’m planning on writing more about the links between carbohydrate malabsorption and nutrient deficiencies soon, when I have some time over the holidays.

Thank you for taking the time to read it! Have a great weekend guys – and stay tuned for the easy to make chocolate peanut butter cookie ball recipe that’s very coming soon.

Natty xo.

Could Fructose Malabsorption be the Cause of your Irritable Bowel Syndrome Diagnosis?

Hi guys, I’m really excited to announce that I was asked to write an article about fructose malabsorption for Suggestic, a website that deals with nutrition, food intolerances and restaurant suggestions. Well, apparently I was a little enthusiastic – I didn’t want to miss anything – so I needed to split the article in two. Here goes part one:

“So you’ve gone gluten free. You had coeliac disease ruled out first – as you should – but you still felt that wheat was a big trigger for your irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). You feel better off wheat – less bloated, more energy – but you’re not quite 100 %. What could it be?

I’m sure that many of you have by now heard of the study behind the media storm that apparently refutes the existence of non-coeliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS). Gluten is a protein that is common to the grains wheat, barley and rye. Contrary to what many of those journalists would have you believe, the researchers did not say that people who identify with NCGS are imagining it; rather, that it might actually be a different component of wheat, other than gluten, or in combination with it, that is causing them to experience IBS-like symptoms, including digestive distress, bloating and others, such as fatigue.

What then could be the culprit behind your wheat-triggered IBS? The answer: it might be fructans (also known as fructooligosaccharides or FOS). Fructans coincidentally happen to be found in large enough amounts to cause symptoms in the gluten containing grains, which includes all varieties of wheat, barley and rye; and they, along with fructose, made my first year of university… let us just say, “interesting.”

Growing up, I always had a fussy gut. When I was going through the last two years of secondary school, it got a little worse but not bad enough for me to really take notice, other than joke about it with friends. It was not until I was in my first year of university that it really got going, dictating not only the parties I could go to but things as seemingly insignificant as which seat I would take in the lecture theatres and what I could wear (think room for bloating). Luckily, my mum had an eye on me and about half way through the year (after end of semester exams really took their toll on my IBS) she read an article about coeliac disease. Digestive distress, nausea, fatigue, brain fog… I ticked most of the boxes, however, I did not have active coeliac disease. My gastroenterologist (since retired) had a game plan though and the next thing I knew I was being sent off to have hydrogen/methane breath tests to check for both lactose and fructose malabsorption*.

I had heard of lactose intolerance before, but fructose malabsorption? Well, fructose malabsorption was my answer and explained why the gluten free diet that my GP had advised me to trial earlier had helped significantly – but not completely…”

Read more at Suggestic.com.

Let me know what you guys think and please share – as awareness of fructose malabsorption spreads, it is more likely that people will be correctly diagnosed and the variety of food choices for us will increase, both at restaurants and in supermarkets.

Read part two here.

Have a great night!

Natty xo.

Travel Series – Flying with Fructose Malabsorption

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I’m not a huge fan of flying. I’m not scared of it but I don’t find it enjoyable, either; long hours (15 hours between Melbourne and LAX) in cramped seating, recirculated air, mostly unsuitable foods and the bathrooms, if you can call them that, all add up to me not having a good time. I stress about connections until we make them and about whether our luggage will make it when we do.

We have had enough mishaps with changed departure gates, delayed planes and missing luggage (LAX is a disorganised hellhole) that Ev and I have become very adept at travelling light. The last time we went home to Australia, we got everything we needed for two weeks, including things for other people, in two carry on bags… and by “carry on” I mean the real carry on bags, not the giant suitcases that American based airlines let people take on and try in vain to cram into the overhead compartments, taking up space meant for everyone. Yes, that annoys me. If I’ve been responsible and packed my belongings into a small suitcase intended for overhead bins, perhaps with valuables in there, I am not impressed when I am told it HAS to be checked, because a 3/4 full plane has already run out of overhead storage. But I digress.

Some people truly do enjoy flying but for the rest of us, here’s how I manage eating with FM and dealing with potential symptoms while flying. It’s pretty appropriate timing, because Ev and I are going to spend the next week in Cabo, Mexico! We’ve been waiting for this holiday since we got back from Cabo last summer. As much as I prefer road trips and exploring different towns, not staying in the one place for too long, sometimes it’s nice to just go and veg out somewhere that is completely relaxing and not have to worry (so much) about the food. As I have said previously, for me, Mexico/Mexican food seems to be a safe bet if I eat plainly and avoid tropical fruits.

The other posts in the travel series can be found here.

I’m sure I’ll be posting photos of tropical paradise on my Instagram account, if you’d like to follow along.

Step 1: Plan ahead, Stress less

Most people don’t need to be told that stress can increase their IBS symptoms; I know I don’t. It’s not all in our heads, though. Research also demonstrates that the two coexist (see here and here), as the autonomic nervous system and certain hormones, which are triggered during times of stress, also act upon the gut.

To avoid stress related IBS and ensure as smooth a travel/flight experience as possible, plan ahead. Some things to consider are:

  • Book your flights as early as possible – cheaper flights means more money in your pocket and less concern about finances during your trip. It’s only a small matter but everything helps.
  • Have all your home-affairs in order well before you go, so you’re not panicking about getting emergency cash out for the house/dog-sitter or paying a last minute bill.
  • Pack early. This is something I can’t help but do, as it all adds to my excitement of going on holiday. It also means you won’t be up until 3 am the morning of your 8 am flight to finish packing your bags.
  • Check in online 24 hours before your flight, if you are able. This means that your seat is reserved on the flight, all you need to do is collect your boarding pass and check in your luggage.
  • Call the airline to ask what their menu will be and decide whether it will be safe for you. This is more important for long haul flights, as I’m pretty sure that standard fare on every flight under 3 hours is a bag of pretzels/mixed nuts and a soft drink/water. Actually, mixed nuts and water sounds fine, thanks. I’ll take that. Just make sure they’re unseasoned.
  • A few days before you fly, call the airline again and re-check your meal preference. I normally go for the gluten free meal and pick what I can from it, supplementing with food I’ve brought from home. The last time I flew between Melbourne and LAX I didn’t do this; my gluten free meal was a normal meal and my husband’s normal meal was vegan. No idea how that happened. What was worse – they don’t carry spares and everyone who had successfully ordered a gluten free meal had shown up for the flight. Which is why I was glad I’d also packed snacks…
  • Pack some non-perishable FODMAP friendly snacks; more on this later, just make sure you call the airline(s) and ask what you are able to take in carry on and what must be in checked baggage.

Step 2: Make some safe food flash cards

If you don’t speak the language, flash cards listing the ingredients you can and cannot consume in the language spoken by the airline/at the airport will help prevent a lot of confusion, if you decide to brave the food.

In fact, even if you do speak the local language, flash cards might still be a good idea as the idea of fructose malabsorption is still so novel that the apparently random list of ingredients that you cannot consume might overwhelm the staff and create an unwanted fuss.

Make sure the lists are clear and concise as to what you can and absolutely cannot consume.

Step 3: Eat plain before the plane

Each time I fly, I will eat plainly in the preceding week, for a few reasons:

  • I know that additional stress seems to set me off with foods I can normally tolerate, so why push boundaries?
  • I want to give my gut the week to calm down, as some foods cause delayed reactions that can last a few days. This way, if I do happen to react to something at the end of the second-to-last week before flying, I have seven days for it to pass.
  • If I am starting from a better place, in terms of my gut, then a small slip up won’t end up with such severe results as it would if my gut wasn’t terribly happy to begin with.
  • Do you want to have diarrhoea on a plane? Exactly.

Step 4: Pack your own food

This will not always be possible, due to customs regulations and such but if you are able, I highly recommend taking FODMAP friendly snack foods to tide you over during flights and layovers while you’re away.

Some ideas include:

  • A variety of foods for different meal times – who wants tuna for breakfast?
  • Non-perishable foods (or at least foods that will keep for a few days outside the fridge) are best.
  • Easily digestible foods that won’t tax your gut too much.
  • Pack the food in a freezer bag and take what you are allowed to inside your carry on luggage. Some carry on restrictions might prevent this, so put it on your list of questions to ask when you call ahead.

Examples of what I might pack:

  • FODMAP friendly veggies of your choice, such as carrot sticks, celery (if you can tolerate polyols), cucumber etc.
  • FODMAP friendly fruits, to a lesser extent, such as bananas and berries. These will need to be kept in a hard case, as they’ll bruise easily while travelling, so I generally wouldn’t bring them on a flight as they’re more likely to get squashed than on a road trip.
  • Muesli bars, like my strawberry pepita or fruit free bars. pictured below. Muffins are delicious but I find that they squash too easily.
  • Pre-packaged snacks, such as corn chips or rice cakes.

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Step 5: Be prepared for the worst

Sometimes, despite our best efforts, shit happens. Literally. While it’s not ideal, you can lessen its impact on your travel by planning for it. If you have an FM-ergency kit, your life will be a lot easier. (See what I did there? You can use it). Keep this in your carry on, you may need it on your flight as well as at your destination.

  • Analgesics to help with cramps – ibuprofen is a known gastric irritant, so I personally don’t use it but if it works for you then don’t stop. I prefer paracetamol (acetaminophen) to help ease cramps, which are not fun to have on a plane.
  • Dextrose/glucose tablets – to help offset any excess fructose that you may accidentally consume, using the co-transport method of absorption.
  • Any supplements that you take, such as a probiotic, digestive enzyme or multivitamin. It’s best not to disrupt your schedule, if possible.
  • Stay hydrated.
  • Wet wipes/baby wipes, in case of an emergency cleaning situation.
  • Any other methods that you know work, such as Buscopan (I’m not saying it does work, it’s just an example). I would advise against using something you haven’t tried before, especially on a plane. It’s best to try those things out at home, beforehand, where you can crawl into a ball and feel sorry for yourself without upsetting the rest of the flight and your holiday.

I hope these guidelines help you fly and travel successfully, as they have me. If you think of anything that I should add, please let me know.