Miniature Savoury Quiches – Low Fructose

What do you do when you have leftover pastry and eggs that need to be used?

Quiches!

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You can make these without the pastry as well, for a low-carbohydrate alternative. Just fill the patty pans a little more but be careful, they do rise!

These are great to make as entrees (appetisers) for dinners or make them on the weekend and have delicious, homemade lunches at work (or school or home!) during the week. Just make a salad to eat with it and people will be giving you filthy looks of jealousy. Or, as in our case last night, the dogs.

I also have a new vegetarian quiche recipe up that uses a different pastry recipe. Try them out!

Savoury Quiches

The following will make 24 miniature quiches.

  • One full batch of GF sour cream pastry
  • 8 eggs
  • 1/2 cup milk or water (cow, unsweetened almond, soy milk)
  • 1/8 tspn. asafoetida
  • 1/2 tbsp. salt
  • 1 tspn. black pepper
  • 1 cup grated cheese (cheddar, Parmesan it’s up to you)
  • 3 tbsp oregano
  • 6-8 rashers GF bacon, diced
  • 1 cup diced vegetables of your choice (spinach, tomato, capsicum, zucchini, mushrooms etc)

Dice bacon and vegetables of your choice. Seal your skillet and then fry the bacon and vegetables until the bacon has just turned crispy. Meanwhile, beat the eggs, milk, asafoetida, oregano, salt and pepper together. Drain the bacon and veggies from the oil and add into the egg mixture. Mix thoroughly.

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Cook the bacon and vegetables

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Mix the bacon and vegetables into the egg mixture

Make the pastry ahead of time according to the instructions on the linked page. It should produce 24 miniature quiches that are about 4-5 cm in diameter. Blind bake them for 15 minutes at 350 F/180 C before removing pie weights and filling the shells with the egg mixture and topping with cheese.

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Continue baking at the same temperature for a further 15 or so minutes, until the tops of the quiche filling has browned nicely and they no longer look runny.

Remove from the oven and let them cool for 10-15 minutes so the pastry can firm up before transferring them to a serving dish.

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Quiches with pastry and blanched greens – ignore the asparagus, I can eat a few stalks without reacting

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Pastry-less quiches for lunch the next day. Left-overs rock.

Enjoy!

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Asafoetida – A Replacement for Onion & Garlic (Low Fructose)

Yesterday I went into Pike Place Market to (and don’t laugh at me here) take Bailey to see the city we’ve moved to. I know he’s a dog and all but I figured that we had dragged him literally half-way around the world and he hadn’t seen Seattle yet. It’s been 2 years. Plus it was a gorgeous day and who needs more of an excuse than that to go into Seattle to the markets and Fisherman’s Wharf?

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As you can see, we visited the markets and a few shops besides; Bails and Nellie were not only allowed in basically all of the stores that didn’t serve food but they also were given a treat in each one. Spoilt things. Seattle really is very dog friendly. Except for Sound Transit (a bus company) – for some reason dogs have to be crated to go on their buses, whereas King County Metro (the other bus company) has no rules other than you have to pay for a dog that won’t fit on your lap and one big dog per bus… just so you know.

Anyway, back to the Asafoetida, also known as Hing. It is an interesting spice, to say the least.

We visited the World Spice Merchants store, which is just behind Pike Place Market – again, the dogs were allowed in and were given treats – and while browsing, the words “onion and garlic flavours hiding within” popped out at me. This was exciting! While I can eat cooked onion and garlic with no issues, I am always looking for replacements to either put with my recipes here or just in case my FM changes and onions and garlic end up on my no-go list.

*Note* After further research on asafoetida, the powder is usually cut with a tiny amount of rice or wheat flour to prevent clumping. I emailed World Spice Market and their current batch (as of May 2013) contains wheat. If you’ve just got FM, this might be ok for you as you only use a pinch in any recipe; if you have Coeliacs, make sure you find a powder with rice flour only.

Asafoetida is made from the sap excreted from the stem and roots of the giant fennel plant, Ferula Assafoetida, which is dried and then ground into a powder. It cannot be eaten raw, as it can cause severe gastrointestinal upset.

However the dried, powdered form in which it can be purchased in America has been shown to alleviate:

  • Gastrointestinal upset and flatulence
  • Cold and flu symptoms
  • Yest infections
  • Anxiety
  • Chronic fatigue
  • Hysteria/insanity
  • Pulmonary issues such as bronchitis
  • Some contraceptive effects

References here and here.

It is very popular as a spice in Indian cuisine as well as soups and stews, due to the onion/garlic/leek taste (as well as a truffle flavour) that it can bring to a dish. It apparently pairs well with cauliflower and legumes.

Asafoetida

There can be side effects to Asafoetida, though. Apparently, it is quite efficacious with regards to flavour, so not much is required – it has the nickname “Devil’s Dung” due to its pungent odour when uncooked. I don’t think it smells as bad as that – at least the version that I bought doesn’t; it’s a bit like a strong onion powder smell.

Due to its potential contraceptive effects, it is recommended that women who are aiming to become pregnant, are pregnant or breast-feeding do not consume this spice as it could cause a miscarriage. It should also not be consumed by young children.

On that scary note, I’m going to experiment with it as a flavour enhancer in a few dishes, without intending to use it medicinally.

Does anybody else out there have any experience cooking with Asafoetida? I’d love to get some recommendations.