Peach Crumble – Fructose Friendly, Gluten Free & Vegan

Peach Crumble - Low FODMAP, Fructose Friendly, Gluten Free & Vegan

I thank my lucky stars quite often that polyols don’t seem to affect me. Avocados, blackberries, peaches… I can still eat them all in reasonable amounts without making myself sick. I think I’ve had to give up enough, without resorting to cutting out those, as well. Of course, I realise that others have had to cut out much more than I – one of the reasons that I am so thankful. No matter how bad you or I may have it, someone else is always worse off.

This peach crumble came about because it’s summer, peaches are in season, I needed a dessert that I could make ahead of time and forget about, and peaches are delicious! A little prep work the day before you need this dessert and you can keep it in the fridge until 45 minutes before you need to bake it (your baking dish, if glass or ceramic, will need time to get back to room temperature before baking or you’ll most likely have a shattered crumble on your hands).

Also, I apologise for the grainy photos, I was using my phone camera.

Notes:

  1. All peaches contain sorbitol in large enough amounts to be considered high FODMAP (according to Monash University) but Clingstone and Yellow peaches are low in FOS, GOS and fructose in servings of one peach. White peaches, on the other hand, contain enough FOS to get a high rating for that FODMAP, as well as sorbitol, in servings of one peach. So, if you only have issues fructans, Clingstone and Yellow peaches are safe; if you have issues with sorbitol, peaches are not advised. I would stick to one slice of this crumble, so as not to over-do the fruit portion of your FODMAP bucket.
  2. Almonds are considered low FODMAP in servings of 10 nuts and high in GOS in servings of 20 nuts. The crumble topping in a single serve of pie doesn’t contain that many almonds, so should be safe – unless of course you have separate issues to almonds.
  3. Desiccated coconut is considered low FODMAP in servings of 1/4 cup and a moderate rating (overall) in servings of 1/2 cup; any more than that and sorbitol becomes an issue.
  4. Pure maple syrup is low FODMAP, watch out for any added ingredients that may cause digestive issues, such as polyols.
  5. This crumble is low in excess fructose, fructans/FOS, GOS, mannitol and lactose. It is not low in sorbitol.

Peach Crumble

Serves 10.

Fruit Filling

  • 6 large ripe peaches (yellow or cling)
  • 1/4 cup castor sugar or 1/3 cup dextrose
  • 1 tbsp. potato or corn starch
  • 2 tsp. cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 1/4 tsp. ground cloves

Crumble Topping

  • 1 1/4 cups almond meal
  • 1 1/4 cups unsweetened desiccated coconut
  • 1/3 cup white rice flour (or gluten free alternative)
  • 1/3 cup virgin coconut oil
  • 1/3 cup pure maple syrup
  • 2 tsp. ground cinnamon
  • 1 tsp. ground ginger

To peel the peaches, score four evenly spaced lines from top to bottom and place them in boiling water for 60 seconds, then strain them and dunk them into an ice bath for a further 60 seconds; the skins should peel right off. If all else fails, use a peeler.

Dice the peaches into bite-sized chunks (approx. 1.5-2 cm) and mix through the rest of the fruit filling ingredients, until well combined; dump the lot into a pie dish.

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To make the crumble topping, mix all the ingredients together, either by hand or in your food processor, until they begin to clump together. Easy! Cover the fruit evenly with the crumble mix and you’re ready to bake or store the pie before baking.

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When you are ready to bake it, pre-heat your oven to 180 C/350 F and bake the crumble for 55-60 minutes, when the peaches should have cooked until soft and the topping browned nicely. If you notice that the crumble is browning too quickly, cover it loosely with a sheet of foil to prevent further browning.

If I am serving this as a hot dessert at a dinner party, I put it in the oven as dinner is served, so we have an hour to eat dinner and digest/chat before the crumble is ready to eat. Serve with vanilla ice cream (vegan or lactose free if required), vanilla bean custard, coconut yoghurt (vegan) or plain Greek yoghurt. Enjoy!

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Baked Peach in Puff Pastry – Fructose Friendly & Gluten Free

Baked Peach in Puff Pastry

While looking through the masses of photos I have taken of meals that we’ve cooked, doing a bit of a sort out to see if I’d missed posting anything – I had, quite a few things actually – I came across this peach dessert. While I love autumn/winter weather, I do miss the cheap and plentiful fruit that is available over spring and summer and looking at this just made me sigh. During the winter I have to survive on bananas and oranges, which get very boring after a while. Seeing all of those beautiful, shiny apples just rubs it in even more!

Towards the end of summer, I had a couple of peaches that needed to go. I was about to slice them into wedges and whip some cream when I remembered that I had some puff pastry left over in the fridge, which reminded me of this post on ‘The Orgasmic Chef’ that I had seen a few weeks earlier. After quickly informing Ev that dessert would be in about 30 minutes, rather than straight away, I whipped out the pastry and began rolling.

Notes:

  1. The pastry contains butter, thus a little bit of lactose.
  2. Peaches contain polyols, so if you malabsorb those then this won’t be suitable. If you are like me and only have to worry about fructose/fructans then go right ahead.

Baked Peach in Puff Pastry

  • About a 1/3 cup sized lump of gluten free puff pastry – sorry for the dodgy measurement!
  • 2 whole, fresh peaches – I prefer yellow
  • 1 tbsp. ground cinnamon
  • 1 tbsp. dextrose/castor sugar
  • 1 tsp. groung nutmeg
  • 1 pinch ground cloves

Preheat the oven to 190 C/375 F.

Roll the pastry out until it’s about 5 mm thick and slice it into four quarters. Slice the peaches in half and remove the stone; if you would like to, you can peel the peach but I was in a hurry to eat dessert!

Place each peach half flat side down on a chopping board and cover it with the puff pastry. Smoosh the joins together so that the peach’s curved part is completely enveloped and trim the excess from the edges. Repeat for all for peach halves.

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Sprinkle the spice/sugar mix on a plate and gently pick up the covered peach half and place it on the plate to coat the bottom in the spices before carefully placing it on a lined baking tray. Do this for all four peach halves before sprinkling the left over spice mix on top of the pastry.

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Bake for 20-30 minutes, until the pastry is completely cooked and a light golden brown. Let the peaches cool for about 10 minutes before moving them to the serving dishes with a spatula – to prevent them from slipping out of the pastry shells. Serve with a dollop of whipped cream, vanilla ice cream or vanilla bean custard… and enjoy! I think the simplicity of this dessert adds to its deliciousness and value. They also taste just as good reheated the next day.

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